Phone: Phone: 785-364-4495

Fax: 785-364-5062

2107 Frontage Rd, Holton, KS 66436

Immunization

catvaccineAt Heartland Veterinary Health Center in Holton, KS we believe that one of the most important aspects of caring for your pet's health is vaccinating him or her against potential diseases. There is simply no better way to protect your pet! A few vaccinations a year will provide immunity against a wide variety of diseases that are harmful and even deadly to your pet! Why wouldn't you do everything you can to protect your pet?

Besides the essential vaccinations, there are some unique risks to pets that live in our region. For this reason, it is important to discuss your pet's vaccinations with our veterinarians and our staff. We also offer some optional vaccinations that your pet may or may not need, depending on his or her lifestyle. Our staff is highly trained to help you decide whether or not your pets need extra vaccinations to stay healthy!

At Heartland Veterinary Health Center, we believe in taking excellent care of your pets. Giving vaccinations is an important part of keeping pets healthy. Feel free to contact us today if you have any questions or concerns about your pet's vaccination.

Helpful Information:

VACCINATION PROTOCOL
Presented below is the general schedule of vaccinations for puppies promoted by Heartland Veterinary Health Center, L.L.C. Other veterinarians’ vaccination protocols may be different. Vaccination protocols for dogs are changing almost yearly as new research is done on duration of immunity.

AGE OF PUPPY VACCINATION/PROCEDURE
6-8 weeks: First examination, first (of 3) “distemper” immunizations.
This is the distemper multiple 5 in 1 vaccine. It protects against Canine Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, Hepatitis, and Parvovirus. We also administer a general oral wormer at this time.

9-12 weeks: Second “distemper” booster and exam. This is done 3-4 weeks after the first vaccine. A second oral wormer will also be administered.

12-16 weeks: Third (and final) “distemper” booster and exam. This is done 3-4 weeks after the second booster. This vaccine will offer prevention for 1 year and will then need to be boostered annually. This booster concludes the series of routine puppy vaccinations. If a puppy starts the series at an early age, 4 vaccines may be needed.

12+ weeks: Rabies immunization. The Rabies vaccine may also be administered with the third series “distemper” booster. This first rabies immunization must be boostered within 1 year; subsequent timely immunizations need be done every 3 years.

Special considerations: Many veterinarians believe some breeds such as Rottweilers and Dobermans should have Parvo vaccines administered every two weeks and may have as many as 5 to 6 series of immunizations by the age of 20 weeks of age.

AGE OF KITTEN VACCINATION/PROCEDURE
6-8 weeks: First examination, first (of 3) RCCP+FELV immunizations. This is the upper-respiratory and leukemia combination immunization. It protects against feline upper respiratory viruses, feline rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, panleukopenia. We also administer a general oral wormer at this time.

9-12 weeks: Second RCCP+FELV booster and exam. This is done 3-4 weeks after the first vaccine. A second oral wormer will also be administered.

12-16 weeks: Third (and final) RCCP+FELV booster and exam. This is done 3-4 weeks after the second booster. This immunization will need to be boostered annually. This booster concludes the series of routine kitten vaccinations. If a kitten starts the series at an early age, 4 vaccines may be needed.

12+ weeks: Rabies vaccination. The Rabies vaccine may also be administered with the third series RCCP+FELV booster. This first rabies immunization must be boostered within 1 year; subsequent timely immunizations need be done every 3 years.

Why so many vaccinations? Good question! No one can be sure that the puppy or kitten will actually mount a good antibody response to the disease just from one vaccination. The age of the puppy or kitten and just how much immunity it has received from its mother will complicate the "probability of protection". So, if the pup or kitten has lots of immunity (called PASSIVE IMMUNITY) that was borrowed from the mother during early nursing, this immunity will actually interfere with the animal’s ability to make its own immunity from the vaccine challenge. The idea is to get the vaccine into the puppy or kitten just as soon as the mother's passive immunity wears off so that the puppy or kitten will develop more lasting immunity of its own. The precise time when a puppy or kitten can respond well to a vaccine is variable: it might occur at 6 weeks of age or 12 weeks. Almost 99% of puppies or kittens will develop a good immune level to the various diseases from a vaccine schedule similar to the one above.

CAUTION! If your puppy or kitten has any trouble breathing after a vaccination, or seems weak, staggers, has pale gums or seems at all unresponsive... contact your veterinarian immediately!

On very rare occasions any animal or human may have a reaction to a vaccination. These are just like the reactions that can occur after an insect sting or medication hypersensitivity. This kind of reaction can be very serious and life-threatening and thankfully is very uncommon. If your puppy or kitten simply seems a little tired or slightly uncomfortable at the immunization site, that is an entirely different and mild response to the vaccination. If you are not sure that your puppy or kitten is OK, call your veterinarian for advice.